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Materials

Started by notard4u, May 15, 2011, 03:01 am

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notard4u


Hey:

Does anyone have any thoughts on using 'mixed' media to complete a build?  I mean. other than than wood alone.  I know fiberglass is an option....I've been pondering the use of insulating sheeting (about 3/4 thickness) and light wood bracing to produce a more economical (easier to construct/dismantle) result.  I'm just throwing this out there, so if this just sounds stupid, please, don't hold back.  The base & corner posts (wood) could be 'filled' in (for at least 3 sides) with the lighter sheeting...maybe the roof could be a mix of the the two as well...hum... ::)

DoctorWho8

I've used cardboard to build complete consoles before.
Bill "the Doctor" Rudloff

notard4u

I guess, of course, the materials are the means to the end product (and the intention of exactly where and how you'll display the replica/build).  The nice thing that attracts me to the idea of the sheeting is that it would probably cut like foam core (without the paper covering) & it is already designed to be and 'exterior' material...the drawback is that it wouldn't hold up to knocks and scrapes as well as more traditional wood materials...which leads me to the conclusion that it might be more suited as a build for interior rather than exterior display purposes.  Probably be excellent for smaller 3/4 or model builds...mmm....time to stop thinking and start building ;)

DoctorWho8

You could glue thin wood paneling onto the foam boards.  That's been mulling in my head for a while.
Bill "the Doctor" Rudloff

notard4u

Quote from: DoctorWho8 on May 15, 2011, 06:15 pm
You could glue thin wood paneling onto the foam boards.  That's been mulling in my head for a while.
Bill "the Doctor" Rudloff


Lightweight & easily 'movable' is my main M.O. for my concept build...the wood paneling is a good idea! 

johnmh

We used hollow core interior doors for the sides on our build - light plywood skinning over a wood frame and expanded cardboard interior.   These provide thickness witout incurring heavy weight associated with a true wood frame and panel construction.  We then glued/screwed thin wood trim pieces to give the illsuion of framing and plexigrass pieces for the windows.  Even with this approach, each side is heavier than I'd like.   The corner posts (hollow 'boxes' made from 1" x4" pine) are a bit heavy in our design.  The two uprights attached to the rear panel make this unit too heavy although the 'half' panels used for the front (one hinged) are about the same weight as the two sides without any attached corner posts.  (We were trying to keep the number of overall pieces and screws needed for assembly to a minimum - which is why the uprights were attached to panels).   The roof and floor are (IMO) still too heavy, being made from 1x wood and 1/8" plywood.  We ended up splitting the roof into two pieces to make it easier to handle and lift.

IF you do not intend to expose your tardis to heavy abuse or outdoor weather, I suspect you could make one with 1/8" plywood sides (again with glued-on trim - wood or cut down foam board) as long as the corner posts were heavy enough to hold the sides straight and square.  You could probably lighten up the roof construction as well by using thin plywood glued and screwed to thicker wood at corner joints.  The base will still need to be fairly substantial to hold it all up (we used 1/2" plywood over a wood frame (all mounted on casters so it could be moved easily).

The various types of foam board available could be a reasonable basis for a build - with thicker insulation board readily forming the 'layercake' roof - but this stuff is not easy to glue and paint.

There will always be a trade off between durability and weight - unless you get into high tech composites, an uneconomical approach.

notard4u

Your response is very appreciated and extremely helpful!  :) Lot of this is trial and error...but your explanation is moving toward where I want to be.  Probably a good gesso primer would work well to coat the insulation material...but again, all this needs to be tested. Thanks again--do you have pix of your build on here?