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Building basics

Started by furstyferret81, May 01, 2009, 10:20 am

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furstyferret81

May 01, 2009, 10:20 am Last Edit: Jan 21, 2010, 09:23 am by scarfwearer
Hi all

I'm looking at building a Tardis for my nephews birthday in August and i just had a few questions.

What is a good cost effective material to use for an outside build? Could MDF/plywood be treated?

What sort of cost will i be looking at?  :'(

Whats the best (simplest) guide around?


I'm not looking at making a 100% accurate one just something that looks right to a 5 year old, maybe even half size?!

Cheers in advance!

Ben



Scarfwearer

May 01, 2009, 03:48 pm #1 Last Edit: Jan 21, 2010, 09:23 am by scarfwearer
Quote from: furstyferret81 board=general thread=1136 post=20442 time=1241173223Hi all

I'm looking at building a Tardis for my nephews birthday in August and i just had a few questions.

Hello and Welcome!

Plywood and regular timber are usual. MDF soaks up water like a sponge, as does chipboard, so neither are recommended for outside use. Any wood you use outside will need plenty of protection if it's to survive more than a couple of years.

This can vary from almost zero to a couple of grand depending on materials. People have built boxes using timber and plywood sheets from skips that look pretty respectable. It depends how much you're prepared to scavenge. If you buy it new, 5 sheets of plywood will cost around £125 (if you're in the UK), and you'll probably want quite a lot of 1x6 for the corners, and 1x3 or 1x4 for decorating the walls and doors, which will likely cost more than the plywood. Top signs, door signs, handles, hinges, and lamp will all add to the cost. You may also want to use acrylic 'glass' rather than real glass if the kids will be using it.

If your TARDIS is going to stay outside, you need to think of it as a shed, and prepare the ground for it, as a full sized TARDIS will normally weigh a lot. You'll also want to have a treated timber base where it touches the ground, and stand that on concrete or patio slabs.

A smaller TARDIS is cheaper and more portable, so it could be moved into the garage when the weather is bad (wheels are good!), but the kids will also grow out of it faster than you might imagine...

Quote from: furstyferret81 board=general thread=1136 post=20442 time=1241173223
Whats the best (simplest) guide around?

Glen Walker has done a builder's guide which is on his website, The TARDIS Library.

Take a look at the FAQ Section which may answer many questions.

And do create a thread in the TARDIS shell builds area once you get going so we can support you in your endeavours. You'll find many other builds there that are worth a look.

Crispin