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Started by stonemason83, Sep 15, 2016, 06:25 pm

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mverta

Feb 04, 2019, 05:38 pm #60 Last Edit: Feb 04, 2019, 06:55 pm by mverta
I would say you're probably right.  You've kind of got splotchy patches of stuff, but not a visually complex field of history.  What is your goal; where are your references?  Even if we're not slavishly following details, we can never have too many references handy to keep us in the vibe.  Also, remember this is about layers - lots of layers, starting with overall and then working to details.  Don't do regions yet, set a stage first.  Real props for shows get the hell beaten out of them and are patched constantly. Even if it's something that seems on the surface like a relatively homogeneous, clean presentation like the Newberry - believe me, it isn't.  And the more you look, the more you see. But if I were you, I'd start by taking some sandpaper to the edges just a touch - they're so sharp they don't catch the light, and this makes everything look cheap and visually less interesting.  Not much, just a touch.

Then I would mix a couple variations of your paint - a slightly lighter and a slightly darker.  Dilute them slightly with water and then brush the entire surface quickly, trying especially to get into crevices, and immediately afterwards, take a paper towel and try like hell to get it off.  You'll only be partially successful.  Repeat.  Then take some sandpaper, like 150-320 and scuff up large random portions of the surface, destroying the sheen.  Hate it, and try to cover it up by pathetically rubbing original-paint-soaked towels over it. Don't be thorough.  Then get some gray and some brown Fuller's Earth and literally douse the entire thing in it.  Panic.  Try to clean it off with a dry paper towel; then with a wet paper towel, but give yourself like 5 minutes to do the job, which isn't enough.  Then wait a day or so, try to clean it up and maybe brush some diluted original color paint over the whole thing to fix your mess.  You'll probably paint right over some remaining Fuller's Earth.  By this point you should probably want to kill yourself and feel like you've ruined everything, which means you're on the right track.  As the layers and history and visual complexity build up, you start to lose track of where things start and end - the whole thing just takes on a richer, more complex appearance, even if you can't say why.  Remember, you can always brush back "fix it" coats of the original paint, though thin ones so you don't ruin the history.  And you can try diluted black and brown washes in crevices as well. 
You almost can't go wrong.  Have fun with this!  The final effect won't be "weathered," it'll be interesting.  You almost won't see it, but you'll feel it.  

I've used this same process successfully on many builds.  When my little boy wanted to be a Ghostbuster, but he's only 7, I found a small-scale, cheap proton pack toy to use as a base.  Of course, it looks like a cheap toy.  But doing exactly what I've described above, plus swapping out a few pieces, it ends up looking like the screen-used ones. The "cheap toy" part is gone. A proton pack may need some extreme weathering, and your TARDIS may not, but the process is the same. It's not hard, it doesn't take extreme amounts of talent or experience or money; just a little fearless fun, and time.

PP_Compare.jpg

Try it! Keep going!

stonemason83

Thanks Mike, i'm now looking for Fullers Earth lol
A few days at work should clear my mind 20190204_144808.jpg
Shoes.?

mverta

This may help.  Take the color out of it for a second and just look at the luminance variation in lights and darks.  May help give you a guideline for the tonal range you might be interested in.

K36887_enhanced.jpg

stonemason83

Reverse printed on PETG.
The same method used to make UK numberplates20190208_100623.jpg
Shoes.?

stonemason83

Shoes.?

stonemason83

Progress still marches on.
A question.
Were their any coach bolts on display on the Black Orchid Newbery?
Shoes.?

Scarfwearer

We have some reference photos for the Newbery Tardis in that episode here: http://tardisbuilders.com/index.php?topic=9370.0
And sure enough there are bolts visible in some of the black and white assembly pictures near the end of the first post.


stonemason83

Thanks, quite tough to see, il get me glasses lol
Shoes.?

Scarfwearer


stonemason83

Ooh, well spotted.
Mines a bit undersized to put 1 there.
Its 10mm square strip wood
Shoes.?

stonemason83

Thats all for now, by no means finished.
Alot more to do.
A new taller base will be built when it is put into storage whilst a kitchen extension is built, where when completed it is going to be a walk- in larder.20190218_112001.jpg20190218_113417.jpg
Shoes.?

stonemason83

An artist contact of 'Toms Refurbishments' the Dalek restorer is hand painting the correct pull to open sign for me as a further alteration.

Also the lamp wont fit under this ceiling but the new ceiling will be a metre higher.
20190218_110001.jpg
Shoes.?

mverta

Quote from: stonemason83 on Feb 18, 2019, 04:44 pm
An artist contact of 'Toms Refurbishments' the Dalek restorer is hand painting the correct pull to open sign for me as a further alteration.


Now that's what I like to hear! :)

stonemason83

The demolition men arrive Monday.
I've got the dear old girl out to safety.
It helps having an understanding wife...
20190308_110956.jpg20190308_105957.jpg
Shoes.?

karsthotep

Quote from: stonemason83 on Mar 08, 2019, 11:31 am

It helps having an understanding wife...



  It does indeed!!!!   I am also lucky that my fiance is ultra supportive in this hobby.   Great job on your refurbishment and good luck with the Reno for its new home. 
I want notes, lists and answers by the time I finish this here Juicy-a-Box! WARNING: I am Thirst-ay! And it is Fruit Punch! And it is Delicious!"