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Flashing Light Unit

Started by 12thdoctor, May 15, 2009, 09:49 pm

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wayne venomous

Here's a video guide I've made on doing the "quick & dirty" method:


Note that once I get the setting right it actually gives a nice fading effect!

Apologies for the poor quality of both the video (my proper camera isn't working) and my voice as I'm absolutely full of cold right now.

Theta Sigma

Oct 25, 2010, 12:14 pm #91 Last Edit: Oct 25, 2010, 12:20 pm by Theta Sigma
Quote from: ivorydrops on Oct 24, 2010, 06:26 pm
I don't mind doing one LUXEON on the circuit, but you will have to tell me how to modify the circuitry on your specifications.  Though, I will admit that I like the fact that I can get all the parts locally and not have to buy one LUXEON piece and pay outrageous shipping for one piece.  Also, futureelectronics.com appears to want to sell lots of 100 though they mention to call for single item purchase.  I think the $8 you mention in your price list is what you got when you called for price per single item.  What was shipping?

Alternatively, I could use any of the ones below.  This might make the difference of shipping from getting at futureelectronics.com and having instance bliss on acquiring the parts.  I am sure other readers would appreciate that option.

Anyway, here are other choices I found, but personally I am not partial to these specifically if you happen to notice a better choice.

5mm High-Brightness White LED ($2 at Radio Shack)
# High visibility, 5mm Round T-1 3/4
# Intensity 7000mcd (typical);viewing angle 30°
# FW current 25mA; FW supply 3.3 (typical), 3.6V (maximum)
# RoHS compliant

OR

5mm White LED ($5 at Radio Shack)
# Typical Voltage: 3.2V
# Typical MCD: 1100
# 20mA (max)
# Viewing angle: 50°



You can get one of the LUEXEON III STAR here:  http://www.newark.com/jsp/search/productdetail.jsp?SKU=93K5808&CMP=AFC-GB100000001.  Shipping is about $5.  

However, while I wasn't looking, they have apparently been discontinued in favor of the LUXEON REBEL.  This could be a good thing, because the newer REBELS are brighter, and have a wide range of different colors of "white".  Here is a good substitute:

http://www.luxeonstar.com/Neutral-White-4100K-20mm-Star-Rebel-220-lm-p/mr-wn120-20s.htm?CartID=1

The drawback is that you have to buy a side-emmiting lens to go with it, which increases the cost a bit.  Here is the side-emitting lens for the above substitute:  http://www.luxeonstar.com/Carclo-Side-Emitting-Lens-p/10267.htm?CartID=2

The problem with the normal LEDs you can buy at Radio Shack is the viewing angle.  The small viewing angles don't lend themselves very well to "beacon" type applications.  You would have to find somewhat to redirect the light sideways.

But, to answer the original question, I would use any two of the above Radio Shack LEDs in series, to substitue for the LEDs shown on the circuit layout that are in series with R6.  You can omit the large 5W resistor if you aren't using LEUXEONs.  The value of R6 would need to be changed to approximately 270 Ohms.  

Here is a neat little calculator that will tell you the value of the resistor you need based on specs for the LEDs:
http://led.linear1.org/led.wiz

"I just put 1.795372 & 2.204628 together." - 4th Doctor

wayne venomous

Quote from: Theta Sigma on Oct 25, 2010, 12:14 pm
The problem with the normal LEDs you can buy at Radio Shack is the viewing angle.  The small viewing angles don't lend themselves very well to "beacon" type applications.  You would have to find somewhat to redirect the light sideways.


Yeah, that was a problem I had. Here's how I resolved it:
lightbulb2.jpg
lightbulb4.jpg
lightbulb5.jpg

I put a 5mm standard LED inside a normal light bulb which is very dangerous if you don't know what you're doing (the glass can shatter when dismantling) but there's other alternatives such as using a "G9" adaptor:
g9-adaptor-cover-gls-softone.jpg

Or using one of those cheap plastic Stick up Bulb things:
JML-Stick-Up-Bulb-0.jpg

Jason

Quote from: wayne venomous on Oct 25, 2010, 12:04 pm
Here's a video guide I've made on doing the "quick & dirty" method:

[snip youtube video]

Note that once I get the setting right it actually gives a nice fading effect!

Apologies for the poor quality of both the video (my proper camera isn't working) and my voice as I'm absolutely full of cold right now.


If I tried this, I might split the tracks to specific sounds.  For example, I might have the left channel have a consistent sound that makes the light flash evenly and then have the right channel do the proper sound.  It does not look too bad though.

Jason
Blue Box Project
http://www.blueboxproject.com

wayne venomous

Oct 25, 2010, 03:27 pm #94 Last Edit: Oct 25, 2010, 03:36 pm by wayne venomous
Audacity is a really good program for editing sounds and it's free to download too.

If you take some time to really play about with the sound waves and volume levels etc on the channel that's operating the LED you'll be able to get some really smooth fades too.

Jason

Got that app.  Also, have Cool Edit, Cubase, and other apps (ie music hobby).  I will try the quick and dirty first (just for kicks), but I think I will also pursue the PCB circuitry -- just because it is more clean and elegant in comparison.
Jason
Blue Box Project
http://www.blueboxproject.com

Jason

Quote from: Theta Sigma on Oct 25, 2010, 12:14 pm
But, to answer the original question, I would use any two of the above Radio Shack LEDs in series, to substitue for the LEDs shown on the circuit layout that are in series with R6.  You can omit the large 5W resistor if you aren't using LEUXEONs.  The value of R6 would need to be changed to approximately 270 Ohms.  


Are those the only changes?  So, If I have R6 to 270 Ohms, omit LED3-6 and omit R7, all I would have to do in the end is hook up the LED to TC2 on the diagram and hope the LED does not go "bang"?

Jason
Blue Box Project
http://www.blueboxproject.com

wayne venomous

Quote from: ivorydrops on Oct 25, 2010, 05:47 pm
Got that app.  Also, have Cool Edit, Cubase, and other apps (ie music hobby).  I will try the quick and dirty first (just for kicks), but I think I will also pursue the PCB circuitry -- just because it is more clean and elegant in comparison.

Oh yeah. It's more of a "building block" than a permanent solution anyway. Plus for long life of the LED it's probably a good idea to have a specially-made circuit.

It's a good introduction to how LEDs work and hopefully should give a bit of confidence in building more elaborate circuits.

Jason

M - a - ybe.  To be honest, I think I need a lesson or a book on building circuit boards.  I personally would like to know more, but the concepts of what can go onto a circuit board are just a bit complicated.  I am very thankful that we have some knowledgeable people on this forum that can come up with a circuit diagram.

I will probably get all the parts and work on the circuit during my Thanksgiving or Christmas vacation.  I have and old electronics builder kit when I was young that allows me to hook up circuit combinations and test them before assembling on a permanent card.  I won't have access to that kit until the holidays which is why I am going to wait until then.

When I finish it, I will post a video of what I got.  Hopefully I won't run into any issues.
Jason
Blue Box Project
http://www.blueboxproject.com

Theta Sigma

Quote from: ivorydrops on Oct 25, 2010, 06:03 pm
Quote from: Theta Sigma on Oct 25, 2010, 12:14 pm
But, to answer the original question, I would use any two of the above Radio Shack LEDs in series, to substitue for the LEDs shown on the circuit layout that are in series with R6.  You can omit the large 5W resistor if you aren't using LEUXEONs.  The value of R6 would need to be changed to approximately 270 Ohms.  


Are those the only changes?  So, If I have R6 to 270 Ohms, omit LED3-6 and omit R7, all I would have to do in the end is hook up the LED to TC2 on the diagram and hope the LED does not go "bang"?




Almost......TC2 can be omitted as well.  Your LEDs will take the place of LED1 and LED2 on the circuit board.  You will just attach wires to those locations, and run them to where you have your LEDs mounted in the lamp.  Polarity is important when using LEDs so make sure you get that right.  Anode is (+), cathode is (-).  The purpose of R6 is to limit current draw and protect the LEDs to keep them from going "bang".
"I just put 1.795372 & 2.204628 together." - 4th Doctor

Theta Sigma

Quote

If I tried this, I might split the tracks to specific sounds.  For example, I might have the left channel have a consistent sound that makes the light flash evenly and then have the right channel do the proper sound.  It does not look too bad though.




Jason, the idea of splitting the channels to make the light flash evenly is brilliant!  I would have never thought of that!  I'm going to have to try it.   I've got an old car stereo around that will be perfect for this.
"I just put 1.795372 & 2.204628 together." - 4th Doctor

Avadh

Flasher Relay.jpg

This is what I am using to make the lamp flash on my tardis once its completed. Its a flasher relay which can make the light flash at different speeds. It has a dial which ranges from 1-10 which is from very slow to very fast so all you have to do is turn the dial on the unit to get the desired speed. It has 2 small switches in the small black square under the dial which can make the light stay on and not flash at all. I have had one of these for 2 or 3 years now and it does an excellent job of flashing the light and at its different speeds. You can buy one from here http://www.nortonicsfoxtam.co.uk/ they do them in different versions and sizes and shapes and I have the exact same one which you can see in the picture which I have added in to this thread.

b4dw0lf

and how much would one of these set you back?
Paul Bradford
Tech Manager, Ghost Hunters International (GHI),
SyFy Channel, USA.
http://www.syfy.com/ghi

http://facebook.com/GHIPaul
http://twitter.com/GHIPaul

b4dw0lf

Ive been looking into a way for my lamp to flash and I think I may have found something so I thought I would share.  I remember having something similar to this for Christmas lights.  And this seems to be made for higher watt bulbs also.

http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/productdetails.aspx?sku=30905

The blink rate seems to be roughly 4 to 6 secs and depending on the bulb I guess determines that...  Has anyone tried this before?

Paul
Paul Bradford
Tech Manager, Ghost Hunters International (GHI),
SyFy Channel, USA.
http://www.syfy.com/ghi

http://facebook.com/GHIPaul
http://twitter.com/GHIPaul

slidin_sidewayz

This may be useful to you. I don't know if you're happy to work with AC but I'm one of those who prefers DC. If you're interested in something that is variable and won't kill anybody, have a look on this page- http://www.asciimation.co.nz/tardis/
Specifically his circuit here- tardis_light_flasher.jpg
Haven't tried it yet, but plan to once I am at that stage.