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Timegirl's TARDIS

Started by TG, Jun 27, 2005, 04:36 pm

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Mark

Sep 04, 2005, 07:15 pm #60 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:50 pm by scarfwearer
Nice TG.

My thoughts on the slopes are to use outdoor filler.

When I was planning the roof for my Met box, I'd noticed there was a slight slope on the Crich box andd wondered how to achieve this. Originally I was going to angle the wood and then thought how complex to work out respective angles etc.

With the exterior filler, I figured I could slap it on and then smooth it out to the angle I needed. This would also have the benefit of filling some of the gaps.

I haven't got a name, but I know there is some filler that you mix yourself (like plaster) but is specifically for outdoor use, and is waterproof. By the time you've primered and painted a couple of top coats, it should be pretty water proof (I think....)

What do you think TG?

TG

Sep 04, 2005, 09:01 pm #61 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:51 pm by scarfwearer
Gaps! what gaps? ;D

I am going off my skirting board a bit - but it does have a nice slopey edge

Filler might be good Mark - I was just worried that over time filler might crack and detach its self from the wood?

Mark

Sep 04, 2005, 10:39 pm #62 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:51 pm by scarfwearer
I suppose it depends on the type of filler you use and the consistancy.

It would have more chance of cracking if you were going to have your TARDIS of the collapsable type.

If you do try it, let me know because I'm planning to use this method!

Scarfwearer

Sep 04, 2005, 11:16 pm #63 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:51 pm by scarfwearer
To get a shallow angle on top of the steps and sign boxes, you could cut a few wood triangles to put under the flashing. This way you wouldn't have to make a long shallow slope the whole way along.
If you wanted you could put thin pieces between them along the back  for extra support. Having air gaps under the flashing would be OK as far as I know.

A handheld circular saw is a nice compromise between jigsaw and table saw. It'll do most of the things a table saw will do, and isn't as scary. They tend to be heavy though.

Crispin

TG

Sep 05, 2005, 04:43 pm #64 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:51 pm by scarfwearer
Thanks Crispin, I think using the flashing with wood (or I suppose filler) underneath will be the solution

I know a table saw is the right way to go and I love my 'compound mitre saw' I re cut all the wood I had cut by hand after seeing how neatly the circular saw cut the wood. I was planning to get a handheld, but I found it so heavy
pathetic I know  :(

Anyway It's a sort of challenge to build a TARDIS in a no-skill-needed, wood-straight off-the-shelf, kind-of-way (I refuse to say 'girly')  :)
TG

Scarfwearer

Sep 05, 2005, 05:34 pm #65 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:51 pm by scarfwearer
Now that I come to think of it, my arm does get tired pretty quickly using a handheld circular saw or indeed an electric drill for longer projects. I sometimes end up borrowing my daughter's cordless drill.
There are plenty of builders here who aren't built like building contractors.
I don't think you're in the 'no-skill-needed' category either, TG - your work's looking great  :D

Crispin

cyberleader1991

Sep 06, 2005, 01:46 am #66 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:52 pm by scarfwearer
When I first started my box back in February, not only did I find the saw heavy, but it was so cold in the garage (say, -20 C) that after every single cut I had to stop and shake my hands!  :o

TG

Sep 07, 2005, 06:58 am #67 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:52 pm by scarfwearer
-20 C !!!!
And you were working on your TARDIS?
That is dedication!



TG

Oct 06, 2005, 05:51 pm #68 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:52 pm by scarfwearer
Talking of wonky TARDIS builds, I think my TARDIS is developing a bit of '2005' about it.
The thing stopping me completing the roof is the fact that the top of the TARDIS is not exactly square - it should be - everything has been checked with a spirit level and measured twice but for the roof to fit, I need to make the first upright step of the roof not square but rectangular (by just under half an inch).Should I just do that? (and remember never to invite Purple round with his tape measure) or should I start taking the bit I've built apart.
Despair :'(
TG

Alcohol makes an ideal substitute for the happiness of perfection....

Scarfwearer

Oct 06, 2005, 06:42 pm #69 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:52 pm by scarfwearer
Welcome back TG - haven't heard from you in a while. Have you been too busy building to post?

Are you going for three steps or two? If three, then I'd make the first step rectangular as you describe and the second step slightly less rectangular and the top one square so that it's easy to fit the slopey bits. Having said that I've ended up trimming the slopes on both the roofs I've made to make them fit, in spite of all my careful measurements, so perhaps it doesn't matter. Working with wood is never that exact a science: the trick is to find ways to hide the, uh, "relative dimensions".
Having said that, it's probably a good idea to measure top and bottom to find out how the difference arose, so you can decide whether the difference will have any other knock-on effects.

Crispin

Ah, but alcohol evaporates quickly and perfection is a myth

purpleblancmange

Oct 06, 2005, 06:51 pm #70 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:53 pm by scarfwearer
Quote from: timegirl board=build thread=1119890187 post=1128621074Talking of wonky TARDIS builds, I think my TARDIS is developing a bit of '2005' about it.
The thing stopping me completing the roof is the fact that the top of the TARDIS is not exactly square - it should be - everything has been checked with a spirit level and measured twice but for the roof to fit, I need to make the first upright step of the roof not square but rectangular (by just under half an inch).Should I just do that? (and remember never to invite Purple round with his tape measure) or should I start taking the bit I've built apart.
Despair :'(
TG

Alcohol makes an ideal substitute for the happiness of perfection....


At least the rest of your build is square and that's all that matters, if one of the doors was an inch wider than the other (like a certain other nameless prop) then my eyebrow may raise a little bit.

Perhaps I should confess something myself... the first step of my roof is slightly out of square as well, not by much, but I know it's there.  Thing is, once it's all in place, you can't see it.

If I were you I'd leave it as it is, so long as it fits inside the rest of the build, then continue building the next two tiers as square as you can!

Anyway, glad to hear from you again.

Mark

Oct 06, 2005, 08:02 pm #71 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:53 pm by scarfwearer
Hello TG, how are you?

1/2 inch difference is not going to be seen that high up, and considering the amount of cutting and measuring involved, I'd be reasonably happy at being only that much out.(adds realism if you ask me!)

Only problem is, as Purple mentioned, you'll know it there. Will knowing be a problem for you TG?


TG

Oct 07, 2005, 07:43 pm #72 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:53 pm by scarfwearer
Thanks Crispin , Purple and Mark

Good! it seems like a consensus and I think 'leave it wonky' was what I wanted to hear.
I can get on with the roof now and make the next two steps perfectly square(ish).

I have been away, on holiday in Scotland. It was a great feeling, when I got back, to lift the tarp and see my half built TARDIS  - really cheered me up. Then when I started checking the measurements for the roof, I lost a bit of confidence in progressing with the build.
And then I got distracted by another project....it seems to happen.

Good to hear that perfection is a myth - it could hardly be a Mr.    ;D

Thanks again
TG

Mark

Oct 07, 2005, 08:16 pm #73 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:53 pm by scarfwearer
hmmmm.......

TG

Oct 08, 2005, 11:04 pm #74 Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:53 pm by scarfwearer
Aw, Mark - I wasn't talking about the men at Rebuilders - they are of course, Perfection  ;)