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Reference pictures: Mk V Console (2005)

Started by Scarfwearer, May 13, 2009, 11:52 am

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The14thDr

Quote from: galacticprobe on Feb 21, 2013, 06:02 am
TripodHub02.jpg
the yellow arrow is pointing to an opening where the spindle of whatever the tripod may have been for could be inserted. (At this size, maybe something for a piece of surveying equipment?)

And as with the one on Captain Jack's ship, the above tri-lobed thingy (below the sextant) also had one of those hard drive spindles covering the top opening in the early Eccleston era. (Not quite sure when that spindle went missing.)

Dino.


To me, this looks like a possible sonic screwdriver charging slot.
"Would you like a jelly baby?"

galacticprobe

Jan 24, 2014, 08:01 am #31 Last Edit: Jan 24, 2014, 08:43 am by galacticprobe
I think we're still trying to figure out exactly what they are (in real life, as in what they're made from, as well as what console controls they are). There was never mention of a sonic screwdriver charger while this console was in use, or in the Classic Series either for that matter.

In fact, a "sonic screwdriver charger" was never mentioned until "The Night of the Doctor", and that "charger" turned out to be the activation control for Emergency Protocol One, which took Clara home when she plugged that gizmo in. (So I doubt that control on the 2013 console was even a sonic charger. Rule 1: The Doctor lies.)

I don't think the sonic ever needs charging. If it's built the same way as Sarah Jane's sonic lipstick, then, as she said in "Revenge of the Slitheen" when the Slitheen's power draining machine sucked all power from everything and her lipstick stopped working: "That's impossible; it never loses power; it can't lose power." (There's probably a link between the sonic and the TARDIS' Eye of Harmony, or summut like that.)

Dino.
"What's wrong with being childish?! I like being childish." -3rd Doctor, "Terror of the Autons"

davidnagel

A nice little cutout from DWM years ago.

DWMTardisConsole6.jpg
Regards
David

galacticprobe

Sep 18, 2014, 07:13 am #33 Last Edit: Sep 18, 2014, 07:13 am by galacticprobe
Wow! That illustrates what I was trying to explain about how those bulkheads are made! (I think I'll edit that other post for clarity.)

Great image, David!

Dino.
"What's wrong with being childish?! I like being childish." -3rd Doctor, "Terror of the Autons"

davidnagel

Sep 22, 2014, 12:00 am #34 Last Edit: Sep 22, 2014, 12:01 am by davidnagel
Stolen off Mark Cordory's website (Mark built the TARDIS interior and many other sets and props for Series 1 and Series 2) here is Mark with one of this console's panels:

mark_panel.jpg

And another two which I believe are from "Boom Town" because of the 'Time Surfboard' and whatever the hell that other thing is:

canvas2.jpg
canvas.jpg
Regards
David

kiwidoc

Thanks David.  The (2) panels Mark made are apparently the replacements needed after a meltdown after  a change of lighting (Runaway Bride?).  The other thing on the panel (panel to the left of the variable resistor) is a one-off prop put in place for series one finale Parting of the Ways - the hook from the towtruck is put through this thing which acts as a way to wrench the panel open (BTW, the panel actually opening on-screen is a cheat - there is just a new panel of some sort resting in place of the real one I believe and the lighting disguises it when it yawns open).

Great reference of the rim though isn't it - what a state to be in after one season of filming!  :)

galacticprobe

Sep 22, 2014, 06:22 am #36 Last Edit: Sep 22, 2014, 06:23 am by galacticprobe
And how the heck did I miss these! :o Now I'm going to have to do a Google search for Mark Cordory and see if I can find his web site. (And oh, what I wouldn't give for a set of those cracked ice panels!)

These are great finds, David! (Talk about great detective work!)

And that rim... it almost looks like some of the base coat under the cream crackle part is purple. As for its condition, even after one season of filming, we have to remember how many times people leaned on the rim (hands as well as Rose's butt at times) - take after take until they got the shot just right. There's bound to be some serious wear.

Dino.
"What's wrong with being childish?! I like being childish." -3rd Doctor, "Terror of the Autons"

kiwidoc

Sep 28, 2014, 08:53 am #37 Last Edit: Sep 28, 2014, 08:46 pm by kiwidoc
By amazing timing, I've been googling vintage aircraft controls and have lucked upon IDing an exact item seen on the 2005 Console, on the plastic panel with the clutchplate and which the monitor was often over.  This item is seen in the bottom left of the panel and the EXACT items is on Ebay currently.  It's more than I'm willing to spend but if anyone here is cashed up and fancies it, I would sure appreciate some photos and measurements when you get it...   :)   But here for your reference is :

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=321102242909&fromMakeTrack=true&ssPageName=VIP:watchlink:top:en

VINTAGE MARCONI ADF CONTROL COCKPIT UNIT 6409 WR.639 - 7777-02-CHN-004.JPG

MARCONIADFUNITWR6396409B.JPG

As seen here:

2.jpg

It's described as "VINTAGE MARCONI ADF CONTROL COCKPIT UNIT 6409 WR.639"

Regards, Glen[

galacticprobe

Sep 29, 2014, 05:35 am #38 Last Edit: Sep 29, 2014, 05:48 am by galacticprobe
ADF: Auto-Direction Finder. Switch to the upper right: OFF (self-explanatory); ADF, you're using this as a homing beacon finder; ANT, you're just using the ordinary antenna for comms signals; LOOP, you've got your input coming from a loop-shaped antenna, tunable to find the best signal via that LOOP knobby in the upper left corner.

BROAD/SHARP switch: listening to broadband or narrowband (sharp) signals.

BFO: Beat Frequency Oscillator; either on or off, and the oscillator is tunable via that knobby on the middle right side. It's used to make Morse code (a.k.a. CW-Continuous Wave) transmissions so you can hear them (rather obsolete since they stopped using Morse Code in the military comms systems back in the 1990s; amateur radio operators still use it, though). It was really good when you needed someone to home in on your signal and couldn't stand there pressing the key button on the microphone to transmit; you just plugged the telegraph key into the jack, set the transmitter to "CW", and placed a book atop the telegraph key... constant "BEEEEEEEE" until you removed the key, someone found you, or, well, lost the ability to transmit for one reason or another.

GAIN (middle left knobby): Adjusted the sensitivity of your receiver (not to be confused with the volume control; the volume control varied how loud the sound was coming out of the speaker, whereas the Gain control set how strong of a signal the receiver would detect).

That ADF window: showed what frequency you were tuned into, and those three large knobs at the bottom adjusted that frequency.

It's amazing how you don't forget some of this stuff! (Glen: "Thanks, for the memories..." ;))

Dino.
"What's wrong with being childish?! I like being childish." -3rd Doctor, "Terror of the Autons"

vortex maker

That picture with Mark Cordory is going to be extremely useful for me, along with the time rotor, the frosted glass console panel is one of the materials I just can't get right on my virtual 2005 console room.

galacticprobe

Oct 01, 2014, 06:21 am #40 Last Edit: Oct 01, 2014, 06:21 am by galacticprobe
Just think "clear, cracked ice". It's what three of those panels look like. The other three consist of two metal mesh panels, and one that looks like it's made from large bubble wrap sandwiched between two pieces of plexi/perspex (as seen in kiwidoc's photo of that panel with the ADF control on it).

Dino.
"What's wrong with being childish?! I like being childish." -3rd Doctor, "Terror of the Autons"

kiwidoc

Incidentally, I asked Mark Cordroy about that plastic panel and he said it was a found material, just like that rather than an effect they'd applied.

galacticprobe

Oct 02, 2014, 04:55 am #42 Last Edit: Oct 02, 2014, 04:59 am by galacticprobe
Quote from: kiwidoc on Oct 01, 2014, 07:01 am
Incidentally, I asked Mark Cordroy about that plastic panel...


The "cracked ice" panel? Or the one that looks like large bubble wrap sandwiched between two sheets of perspex? Because if it is the cracked ice panel, then that article in the Doctor Who Magazine explaining how they made those panels is off. (And that would be an important thing to know. Another important thing - or at least a nice thing - to know is how they got those indents for the bubble globe paperweights into the panels if they were made from "found material".)

Dino.
"What's wrong with being childish?! I like being childish." -3rd Doctor, "Terror of the Autons"

kiwidoc

Sorry Dino, I was referring to the "bubblewrap" panel which is made from some sort of plastic.  The other panels are made from clear resin and were reportedly up to 2" thick.  The texture (ice/cracks) and dimples for balls were moulded into them at creation - the dimple probably from sitting a ball on top of the resin (cling-film seperating them) as it set.

cheers, Glen


Quote from: galacticprobe on Oct 02, 2014, 04:55 am
Quote from: kiwidoc on Oct 01, 2014, 07:01 am
Incidentally, I asked Mark Cordroy about that plastic panel...


The "cracked ice" panel? Or the one that looks like large bubble wrap sandwiched between two sheets of perspex? Because if it is the cracked ice panel, then that article in the Doctor Who Magazine explaining how they made those panels is off. (And that would be an important thing to know. Another important thing - or at least a nice thing - to know is how they got those indents for the bubble globe paperweights into the panels if they were made from "found material".)

Dino.

galacticprobe

Oct 02, 2014, 06:23 am #44 Last Edit: Oct 02, 2014, 06:26 am by galacticprobe
Ah. Then the article was right; it said those cracked ice panels were indeed 2 inches thick, and were laminated - alternating a layer of clear, thick plastic and clear resin, resulting in that cracked ice look (and that "ocean wave" look to the panels' surface). They probably did just press those bubble globes into the mixture to create the recesses, and if that top layer was just the final sheet of plastic, then they might not have needed anything to separate the bubble globes from the panels as the top sheet wouldn't have had any resin on it. (At least that's how that top layer looks in some of those unlit reference photos.)

Now I wonder what sort of plastic paneling has that bubble wrap look to it? I've never come across it, and I'd been looking.

Thanks for the info, Glen!

Dino.
"What's wrong with being childish?! I like being childish." -3rd Doctor, "Terror of the Autons"