Jun 23, 2024, 10:29 am

News:

New, New TardisBuilders!


Jam Jar Lurker's Golden TARDIS

Started by Jam Jar Lurker, Mar 27, 2020, 07:18 am

Previous topic - Next topic

Angelus Lupus

Well, as painful as it is to see anyone cut into their Tardis like that, it certainly looks a lot nicer than the ragged hole they had for the power cable early on in the 2005 box's life! I'd bet after a while, and from a distance, it's barely noticeable!
A mixed-up non-conformist, trying to fit in.

Volpone

[This is kind of off-topic, but it relates to cutting holes in things so I'll chance it.  If it is a derailment, I'll warn myself and delete it]

Last year I bought a house as a rental property.  Getting it renovated took a lot longer than I'd planned.  One of the last things I had to do was fix a leak for the bathtub.  I saved it for last because I figured it was in the drain so I could get at it from the crawlspace.  Unfortunately, when it came time to address it, there was clearly water dripping from up inside the wall. After a day of troubleshooting, I decided the best option was to take some measurements and then cut an appropriately sized hole in the kitchen wall, so I could get at the plumbing from behind. 

Well, I made one faulty assumption when I was doing my troubleshooting:  I thought I had *a* leak for the bathtub.  So when I was doing my troubleshooting and noticed water running up in the wall and later water was dripping from a pipe in the crawlspace, I assumed the water was running down the pipes from the wall and dripping off the lowest pipe.  In reality, I had TWO leaks:  One in the wall when I replaced the cartridge for the faucet and put a new spigot on and then a leak in an elbow joint down in the crawlspace. I managed to fix the wall leak during my troubleshooting.  BUT...

Because I figured it would be easier to repair the leak if I started with dry plumbing (so I could see exactly where the leak was as it started) I didn't do any testing the next day.  I just came in and chopped a big hole in the drywall in my kitchen.  Turned on the water and couldn't find a leak--until I went down in the crawlspace and realized what had happened.  It took me 3 days of plastering, sanding, and painting before I didn't have a "HEY, LOOK AT THIS BIG SQUARE PATCH RIGHT HERE ON THE DINING ROOM WALL". 

So I'm glad your hole-cutting appears to have worked out much better.  Be interesting to see how effective it is.  I feel like someone put a vent fan in a TARDIS years ago, but I can't even begin to think where to look for that.  The thing that worries me is having 1 vent, down low, there's really not much to create circulation.  I guess we'll see.  Or was your floor vented too?  I forget.  And just brainstorming as I typed, it occurs to me that charcoal is a natural humidity control.  I may try sticking some charcoal in my TARDIS to see if that does anything.   
"My dear Litefoot, I've got a lantern and a pair of waders, and possibly the most fearsome piece of hand artillery in all England. What could possibly go wrong?"
-The Doctor.

kutan66

Just for future reference... you are allowed to use masking tape when using sealant! :-)

Quote from: Jam Jar Lurker on Aug 10, 2020, 08:56 amThe Adventure of the Ventilation Shaft

PSX_20200810_093623.jpg

Jam Jar Lurker

Sep 04, 2020, 10:02 pm #138 Last Edit: Sep 04, 2020, 10:05 pm by Jam Jar Lurker
Quote from: Volpone on Aug 11, 2020, 01:37 pm[One of the last things I had to do was fix a leak for the bathtub...

*****

The thing that worries me is having 1 vent, down low, there's really not much to create circulation.  I guess we'll see.  Or was your floor vented too?  I forget.   

Sorry... I meant to reply to this at the time.

I remember spending months trying to trace a leak in the bathroom in my old flat/apartment. Every few weeks it would leak into the neighbours downstairs. But no matter how how many plumbers the insurance company sent out, no one could find it. Turned out to be a support for the floorboards which only went halfway across the room and rested on the pipe, eventually squeezing it out of shape. When the boiler was replaced, the new water pressure was too great... But we all just looked under the bath rather than half way across the room.

BTW my TARDIS floor not ventilated.

Francis
"Have courage, and be kind... Where there is kindness, there is goodness. And where there is goodness, there is magic."

Jam Jar Lurker

Sep 04, 2020, 10:54 pm #139 Last Edit: Sep 04, 2020, 10:59 pm by Jam Jar Lurker
The Rain of Terror

I've held off updating as there is an issue I was hoping to resolve first, but here goes...

I brought my TARDIS home in the middle of a three day torrential storm. And bar the three or four weeks of beautuful weather around Easter during which I installed and (attempted to) weatherproof the old girl, the rain has been more persistent and vicious than I have ever seen in all my fifty years. That poor box has been assailed and assaulted every couple of days.

There is a regular small puddle on the inside of the left hand door. I think this is probably unavoidable (and aided by the slabs I laid being ever so slighly off the level).

About two months ago I noticed that the puddle was becoming significantly larger. You may remember that I had added some rubber weather stripping at the foot of the doors. Moonbeam and Dave advised that I looked beyond the immediate area. I discovered that the front sign box had moved a little  (on the TPE it's a stand alone piece which forms part of the door frame). I resealed it and also added some weather stripping where the doors met the posts to close off  gaps (the picture shows the strip unpainted, but it's very convincing when painted). I briefly added some stripping to the inside foot of the doors; this was effective but trapped water underneath the doors so I removed it.

These amendments significantly reduced the puddles.

The lamp leaked so I added some sealant to where the bottom of the fresnel met the metal of the base, which worked a treat.

I then discovered that water had started to go gather in the inside of the right hand sign box (and occasionally the left). So far I've not been able to determine where it's entering the sign; the area above and to the sides remains dry.

I added sealant to the outside of the sign boxes and where the wood meets the perspex. This hasn't  helped. I've covered the whole of the stacks with sealant. This hasn't helped. I've poured water onto the stacks section by section to locate the source of entry... And nothing comes through until it rains heavily.

So I'm a bit stumped at the moment.

Francis PSX_20200904_224350.jpgPSX_20200904_224413.jpgPSX_20200904_224443.jpgPSX_20200904_224503.jpgPSX_20200904_224542.jpg
"Have courage, and be kind... Where there is kindness, there is goodness. And where there is goodness, there is magic."

Volpone

Sep 05, 2020, 06:33 am #140 Last Edit: Sep 05, 2020, 06:35 am by Volpone
I recently reread all the Fleming Bond novels. I can't find it now and I'd have sworn it was in "The Man With the Golden Gun," but I remember a bit with M, briefing Bond and saying that by the time someone is 40, life has knocked them around enough, they've had enough failures and unexpected disappointments and they have enough things they care about that they are no longer as bold and decisive as they used to be.  I live in that place these days. 

Water is persistent and insidious.  Until I'm ready to reshingle the garage, I gave up and stapled plastic to the joists inside to funnel leaks out to the eaves.  I've got 2 intermittent leaks in the roof of the house--at the chimney and at the corner of the attic ladder.  They leak maybe every 2 years, when the rain is coming from just the right direction. 

The TARDIS?  Don't get me going.  I did learn fiberglassing while building an A-Team van so after my original roof finally failed, I laid fiberglass over the entire(?) roof.  I add the "(?)" because the front right corner is absolutely soggy with any rain at all--but I have no idea where it is coming from. 

I've started screwing cement board (like they use for tiling or doing tub surrounds) at spots where the plywood has rotted through.  And I've started seriously using "thinset" for structural purposes.  Thinset is plaster used to lay tile. Officially it isn't designed for outdoors, but it works really well from my experience.  Comes in 4 gallon tubs with chemicals to keep it from hardening in the pail during storage.  Had some laying around so I used to to add bevels to my trim wood and "texturize" the panels.  I've since used it to rebuild huge chunks of rotted wood. 

This is all a really long way of saying "I feel your pain."  Fighting with water on an outdoor box is like taking care of a loved one with cancer.  Not the same, but a similar ballpark--you come up with a plan and it fails, so you make another plan that also fails.  And you keep trying things because of the stakes and try to keep your spirits up as you fail and fail and fail. 

Your problem is that you've got a Matt Smith TARDIS.  So it ideally should look relatively pristine.  Luckily I have a fairly indeterminate 20th century TARDIS.  So if it looks like it was made out of cake frosting, that kind of adds to the charm. 
"My dear Litefoot, I've got a lantern and a pair of waders, and possibly the most fearsome piece of hand artillery in all England. What could possibly go wrong?"
-The Doctor.

russellsuthern

Hi.

I feel your pain, too.

TB is often not just a "TARDIS Builders information group" but an "Outside TARDIS owners support group."

Once you own an outside TARDIS, it's a constant battle with the elements. It never goes away.

I need to give mine a look over.
Lots of minor cracks & gaps that need filling before they get too bad. And she needs another couple of coats of paint.

Difficult to afford the materials you need during the lockdown, but now things are slowly getting back to a new normal, I am going to get my bottom into gear & get it done in September.

Good luck with yours.

Keep fighting - It's worth it!

Regards,

Russ

fivefingeredstyre

Sep 05, 2020, 08:14 am #142 Last Edit: Sep 05, 2020, 08:19 am by fivefingeredstyre
Quote from: Jam Jar Lurker on Sep 04, 2020, 10:54 pmThe Rain of Terror

I've held off updating as there is an issue I was hoping to resolve first, but here goes...

I brought my TARDIS home in the middle of a three day torrential storm. And bar the three or four weeks of beautuful weather around Easter during which I installed and (attempted to) weatherproof the old girl, the rain has been more persistent and vicious than I have ever seen in all my fifty years. That poor box has been assailed and assaulted every couple of days.

There is a regular small puddle on the inside of the left hand door. I think this is probably unavoidable (and aided by the slabs I laid being ever so slighly off the level).

About two months ago I noticed that the puddle was becoming significantly larger. You may remember that I had added some rubber weather stripping at the foot of the doors. Moonbeam and Dave advised that I looked beyond the immediate area. I discovered that the front sign box had moved a little  (on the TPE it's a stand alone piece which forms part of the door frame). I resealed it and also added some weather stripping where the doors met the posts to close off  gaps (the picture shows the strip unpainted, but it's very convincing when painted). I briefly added some stripping to the inside foot of the doors; this was effective but trapped water underneath the doors so I removed it.

These amendments significantly reduced the puddles.

The lamp leaked so I added some sealant to where the bottom of the fresnel met the metal of the base, which worked a treat.

I then discovered that water had started to go gather in the inside of the right hand sign box (and occasionally the left). So far I've not been able to determine where it's entering the sign; the area above and to the sides remains dry.

I added sealant to the outside of the sign boxes and where the wood meets the perspex. This hasn't  helped. I've covered the whole of the stacks with sealant. This hasn't helped. I've poured water onto the stacks section by section to locate the source of entry... And nothing comes through until it rains heavily.

So I'm a bit stumped at the moment.
I feel your pain. I've long since given up all hope of completely waterproofing my box. It's impossible and Water always wins.

Sorry to be the barer of bad tidings like this, but I've always thought rain ingress was the real reason why original Police Box doors open outwards, and the floor has a slope towards the door, so that the water can run out...

The shape of the police box is obviously different to that of a house. If the roof overhung the sides, the way it does on a traditionally built house, the we wouldn't have this problem. Likewise if we didn't have sign boxes, the window frames came with a larger drip trim and the base didn't stick out as far as it does, water would run off with no problem at all. Even a garden shed is more weather proof than a police box.

Over the years the best I've come to hope for has been to minimise the amount of water that gets in with the acceptance that it will happen. I'm not doing too bad now; however it took me a long time to get to the point where i'm just finding small puddles.

The way I constructed my box and the position I sited it in didn't help. It was originally surrounded by trees which I allowed to grow over it quite closely. All that did was prevent the sun from drying it out after heavy rain and kept things damp. These days I keep it the area quite open; however it took years before I realised that mistake and I've spent a lot of time over the last couple of years replacing rotten wood. The signs have always been a problem. Wood flexes with the rain and perspex doesn't, meaning that any sealant on this area will breakdown over a surprisingly quick time. I should have oversized the signage and fitted channels into the frames so that the signs recess into them rather than flush fit from the inside; however hindsight is a wonderful thing...

I've learned a lot as time has past though, and if/when I replace my box I will be constructing the parts differently and allowing for more ventilation in the base and using harder wood. Or maybe even fibreglass with a steel frame?

moonbeam

Hi Francis, I can only imagine how difficult it is to waterproof an outdoor Tardis, it's definitely a shape that doesn't lead itself to being waterproof!
Judging by your pictures though you've had a bloody good go. The only thing I can think of is are you pouring water on the roof? It's just you mention it only does it in heavy rain. I'm just thinking of trying a hose pipe where you could vary the pressure and spray you Tardis at different angles?

Jam Jar Lurker

Quote from: Volpone on Sep 05, 2020, 06:33 amI remember a bit with M, briefing Bond and saying that by the time someone is 40, life has knocked them around enough, they've had enough failures and unexpected disappointments and they have enough things they care about that they are no longer as bold and decisive as they used to be.  I live in that place these days... 

I think it was Stormin' Norman who I heard talking during the Gulf War about Known Knowns, Unknown Knowns, Known Unknowns and Unknown Knowns (it makes perfect sense once you get your head around it). When we're young we can just jump into things without worrying; as we get older we realise there are far more hazards and pitfalls out there than we know about.  The Known Unknown Unknowns, if you will.

I committed to buying my TARDIS on a Sunday and collected it the following Saturday. Had I known on that Sunday what I learned in that week before even setting eyes on her, I might never have committed. But I'm sure glad I did.

Francis
"Have courage, and be kind... Where there is kindness, there is goodness. And where there is goodness, there is magic."

Jam Jar Lurker

Quote from: russellsuthern on Sep 05, 2020, 07:08 amTB is often not just a "TARDIS Builders information group" but an "Outside TARDIS owners support group."

Keep fighting - It's worth it!

I love that! Enthusiasms and worries are things that need to be shared.

If you remember, my TARDIS was an early 50th present. My birthday was during the summer, just as my watch-through reached the 4th Doctor. I remember the 3rd's last season, but it really came alive for me when Mr Baker arrived. If I'd known then that one day I'd have my own TARDIS, I'd have probably promised to repaint it every day!
"Have courage, and be kind... Where there is kindness, there is goodness. And where there is goodness, there is magic."

Jam Jar Lurker

Quote from: fivefingeredstyre on Sep 05, 2020, 08:14 amOver the years the best I've come to hope for has been to minimise the amount of water that gets in with the acceptance that it will happen. I'm not doing too bad now; however it took me a long time to get to the point where i'm just finding small puddles.

Or maybe even fibreglass with a steel frame?

The puddles I'm reluctantly coming to terms with; the inside has the same coating as the exterior and it's not too big a hassle to wipe up whenever it rains.

I'm just a little paranoid that the water will be causing some damage  as it makes its way to the sign box shelf.

Speaking of fibreglass, I wonder how owners of the TPE Jodie box are getting on?
"Have courage, and be kind... Where there is kindness, there is goodness. And where there is goodness, there is magic."

Jam Jar Lurker

Quote from: moonbeam on Sep 05, 2020, 09:47 amThe only thing I can think of is are you pouring water on the roof? It's just you mention it only does it in heavy rain. I'm just thinking of trying a hose pipe where you could vary the pressure and spray you Tardis at different angles?

I have poured a fair bit of water, but not with a hose and not on the slope of the roof. I concentrated on the stacks, posts and sign boxes, figuring it was just running off the slopes onto them.
"Have courage, and be kind... Where there is kindness, there is goodness. And where there is goodness, there is magic."

scotland yard

Quote from: Jam Jar Lurker on Sep 05, 2020, 01:41 pm
Quote from: moonbeam on Sep 05, 2020, 09:47 amThe only thing I can think of is are you pouring water on the roof? It's just you mention it only does it in heavy rain. I'm just thinking of trying a hose pipe where you could vary the pressure and spray you Tardis at different angles?

I have poured a fair bit of water, but not with a hose and not on the slope of the roof. I concentrated on the stacks, posts and sign boxes, figuring it was just running off the slopes onto them.

Not being a waterproofing expert, I think you should try with a hose trying to simulate rain? I'm also not an expert in physics, but maybe if you just get your bucket of water and pour it on the TARDIS the surface tension helps keep some of the water from going into the cracks, which wouldn't happen if you had only tiny droplets of water?

Also, OCD me thinks even if it's unlikely that the water gets in through the roof, you should test it anyway. At least, just for a more accurate simulation test. Because it may not be just the water running off the roof, but more how does it run off the roof, it may be a matter of the angle the water falls into the top sign boxes.
Oh my giddy aunt!!

Angelus Lupus

I recently watched a video of someone making a habitat for a lizard (it's relevant, I promise) and they protected the inside from the humidity and moisture with an epoxy-based paint called 'pond shield'. Might that be something to look into? (Admittedly my knowledge of weatherproofing is virtually nil.)
A mixed-up non-conformist, trying to fit in.