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TARDIS Materialization Remastered

Started by mverta, Sep 20, 2018, 03:46 am

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mverta

I like the idea of enhancing/updating classic sounds, but I loathe screwing with originals.  To help resolve this conflict, I took the cleanest original 60's/70's/80's sound I could find, and went digging into the frequencies to see what might be in there.

As might be expected, pretty much everything below about 200Hz is severely limited, but it's in there - low frequency rumbling, a pronounced descending frequency sweep...

So I tried bringing those out, boosting some of the partial harmonic frequencies relative to the fundamentals, and giving a bit of widening air to things.  Oh, and also boosted the lows in the ending hit (too much, I think, but it's a WIP)...

The result so far has at least the benefit of being created entirely out of the original material, without generating any new layers.  And it's definitely got more presence - is that.. better?  Hard to say.  After hearing this one, the original really does seem anemic, but... well, anyway, more thoughts to come on this one.

http://mikeverta.com/Posts/TARDIS_Remastered_Short.mp3
http://mikeverta.com/Posts/TARDIS_Remastered_Full.mp3



deafeningsilence

Sep 20, 2018, 04:01 am #1 Last Edit: Sep 20, 2018, 04:02 am by deafeningsilence
I like it. It's a bit...bassy, I suppose, but then when one has a semi-sentient time machine capable of tearing literal holes in the fabric of reality itself and traveling through them, bass is to be expected. If anything, I think the sound bounced between the left and right earbuds a tad too much, but that's it.

mverta

That's my general feeling as well, I just can't be sure that isn't the nostalgia talking, which is why I thought I'd put it out there. 

Would be so great if they could find the original files and re-capture them, but then again it's likely the original sounds are band-limited as well.  I'm going to try a pass with less of their low frequencies and panning stuff and see if that isn't better.

The14thDr

Quote from: mverta on Sep 20, 2018, 03:46 am
So I tried bringing those out, boosting some of the partial harmonic frequencies relative to the fundamentals, and giving a bit of widening air to things.  Oh, and also boosted the lows in the ending hit (too much, I think, but it's a WIP)...

I have no idea what you just said, but it sounds cool! ;D

Those are some great sound effects, thanks for sharing. :) Would you mind if I downloaded them for my TARDIS console? Purely for personal use of course; my console has an MP3 player inside which I use to play various sound effects and these would be perfect.
"Would you like a jelly baby?"

Angelus Lupus

I like it! But I do agree that the panning is just a little overdone. Doesn't quite have the feel of a space/time machine materialising into being, more like my speakers aren't behaving  ;D
I just had a thought that would only really work for surround sound: The noise is shifting, or swirling, around you 360° then gradually condenses to where the Tardis lands. There's a situation I could really go for a change in sound direction. (shame I don't have surround-sound - or more than basic audio editing skills - or I might play with this idea myself)
A mixed-up non-conformist, trying to fit in.

mverta

You're welcome to, but I would wait just a bit for me to make a couple adjustments!

galacticprobe

Sep 21, 2018, 04:26 am #6 Last Edit: Sep 21, 2018, 04:29 am by galacticprobe
Quote from: Angelus Lupus on Sep 20, 2018, 12:54 pm
I just had a thought that would only really work for surround sound: The noise is shifting, or swirling, around you 360° then gradually condenses to where the Tardis lands.


One would have to be careful how this was done. Sound waves are pressure waves, and this could cause dizziness in someone that has inner ear troubles. It could feel like being below deck on a rolling, pitching vessel where there is no visual reference to the horizon. Your ears would tell the brain that things are moving, but your eyes would tell the brain that they aren't seeing any movement. It's this eye/ear conflict that causes seasickness (or motion sickness in general), and goodness knows what sort of affect it would have on someone with Meniere's Disease.

In principle, however, it does <pardon the pun> sound like it would be cool.

Dino.
"What's wrong with being childish?! I like being childish." -3rd Doctor, "Terror of the Autons"

mverta

Sep 21, 2018, 06:24 am #7 Last Edit: Sep 21, 2018, 06:25 am by mverta
Actually, in practice, this would be extraordinarily unlikely because the percentage of people who have surround which is properly doing surround is about .0001%.  It drives us nuts.  We work in very carefully engineered mixing spaces and when the imaging is right, the walls disappear.  But ultimately, most people with surround sound are merely "surrounded by sound," which does not have the holophonic staging necessary to truly disorient.  Even in my mixing room, the sweet spot is only wide enough for a few people before the effect falls apart.  When it's right, it's amazing, but like everything else in mixing (and post-production for that matter), our idealized creation environments bear little resemblance to how 99% of the world hears/sees our work.  Maybe in this case, that's best. :)

_Mike

Angelus Lupus

Quote from: mverta on Sep 21, 2018, 06:24 am
...when the imaging is right, the walls disappear...

Ok, this sounds like it might be fun to experience!
A mixed-up non-conformist, trying to fit in.

fivefingeredstyre

Actually thats pretty cool. I had a go at something similar a couple of years back for a project I never finished, Which is the story of my life! The intention was to install a sound system in my Police Box...

Not as revolutionary as yours; however I wanted a version that would cover a short journey, so it started with a take off, then in-flight and then transitioned to a landing. I also wanted it to disorientate a little, so I created rotating stereo fields for each of the "Vworps" combined with a gradual stereo field pan across the flight section, culminating in a reverse rotation effect for the landing. The plan was to install speakers in my box in each of the corners to the noise would effectively rotate around the occupant, leaving them a little pleasantly disorientated by the process. 

I don't want to derail your thread, Mike, but if your interested I can post the file...


Angelus Lupus

Quote from: fivefingeredstyre on Sep 23, 2018, 08:59 am
I created rotating stereo fields for each of the "Vworps" combined with a gradual stereo field pan across the flight section, culminating in a reverse rotation effect for the landing


And as these words whoosh over my head, you'll see why I said I only had basic audio editing skills!  ;D
A mixed-up non-conformist, trying to fit in.

mverta


fivefingeredstyre

Sep 24, 2018, 08:16 pm #12 Last Edit: Sep 24, 2018, 08:17 pm by fivefingeredstyre
OK... lets see if this works

https://soundcloud.com/user-743559052/demat-and-mat-rotating-stereo

Looks like it does :)

It works best if you get your head in the middle of your speaker system, so the sound travels all around you...

fivefingeredstyre

That was the plan, Stan... I wanted it to rotate around four speakers to make it feel like teh box was moving.

It was designed play around the inside of my box, but not be as disorentating as it is running from your desktop as the speakers were supposed to be positioned above your head.

But I never got around to doing this...  ;D